Gemvision Opens Up New Production Choices With New CounterSketch Studio International

Gemvision and Stuller are set to launch the newest version of their retail semi-bespoke 3D design program CounterSketch in January 2016.

Their new version will be called CounterSketch International, and for the first time it will allow users to directly download their CounterSketch models as both .3dm and mesh files for their own manufacturing use with no additional charge.

Gemvision CounterSketch International

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Frequently Asked Questions 10 – 3D Scanning, Model Conversion, and Jewellery CAD

(or “Why can’t we just 3D scan a ring and make copies on a 3D printer?”)

goscan3d 3d part scanner

The GoScan3D hand-held part scanner demonstrates just how portable 3D scanning is really becoming. But how useful is it for parts like jewellery?

Last Updated 14 June 2016.

This is a question which seems to come up mainly among advanced students or those already experienced with using CAD for jewellery, but I do get the occasional person who has just been to a trade show and seen the latest 3D scanning machine released onto the market. Either way I reckon this is a good question to answer next, as it ties in with several other FAQ articles I’ve written previously for this site.

It seems for the past 10 years 3D scanners have been improving rapidly in terms of scanning resolution, scanned mesh quality, assembly of data, ease of use, and efficiency of file sizes (otherwise known as decimation to those who work with the machines).

You’ll even see salesmen and technicians at trade shows demonstrating how easy it is to 3D scan a ceramic or plastic part or a visitor’s face, import it straight into their program, and manipulate the mesh form in full colour.

So why doesn’t this scanning device work the same way with jewellery?

Well, it kind of does, but not at all in the way you would expect, and as of the date this article was written 3D scanning still faces some serious technical limitations. To answer this question fully, I’ll have to answer the question in three parts: the differences between the various CAD geometry types used by 3D modelling software packages, the problems with model conversion, and the technical limitations of the 3D scanners themselves.

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Video Tutorial – Matrix to Rhino Jewellery CAD Techniques Part 2 – Gem Cutter, Gem On Surface, and Prongs

And now for the second of my two jewellery CAD video tutorials focusing on how to use Matrix CAD techniques in Rhino. This one covers the Gem Cutter, Gem on Surface, and Prong tools.

 

As with the previous tutorial, those who might be concerned about whether this would make Matrix unnecessary shouldn’t be– when you watch the video it quickly becomes clear that these techniques won’t approach the efficiency of Matrix. However, it’s nice to know that if you’ve taken a Matrix class you won’t be stuck if you have to downgrade to Rhino.

Video Tutorial – Matrix to Rhino Jewellery CAD Techniques Part 1 – Ring Rail, Profile Placer, Gem Loader and Bezel Builder

You asked for it, so here it is:

I present the first of my two jewellery CAD video tutorials focusing on how to use Matrix CAD techniques in Rhino. This one covers the Ring Rail, Profile Placer, Gem Loader, and Bezel Builder.

 

 

To those who are concerned about whether this would make Matrix unnecessary– when you watch the video it quickly becomes clear that these techniques won’t approach the efficiency of Matrix. However, it’s nice to know that if you’ve taken a Matrix class you won’t be stuck if you have to downgrade to Rhino.

Gemvision Design Contest 2014 is Now Open

It seems this week we don’t just have one competition starting, but two!

Gemvision‘s annual Design Contest has just opened, and is accepting designs for Gemvision Matrix and Countersketch.

Gemvision Design Contest 2014

There are several categories. Check out the Gemvision website for more information on entry rules and possible entry categories.

What Makes a Bespoke Design Customer?

For all the fuss made in recent years about the resurgence of bespoke design, and how it would revolutionise the state of luxury goods and crafts, it seems the actual benefits of this change have been far more sporadic and unevenly distributed than originally expected.

For all the people spending money on bespoke designs and consumer goods, where is all the business going?

Perhaps the way to answer this question is to look a bit more into the main characteristics of customers for bespoke design (also known as custom design).

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